December 15, 2014

Does Your Child’s Bedroom Make it Easy to Sleep?

Did you know that you child might be suffering from sleep deprivation too? If there are too many distractions or too much light, your son may be too hyper to get enough sound sleep to get through the day.


Insomnia is a common complaint among adults, understandable when there is more month than money and more tasks than time in the day. But did you know that you child might be suffering from sleep deprivation too? According to the National Institute of Health, when a child has difficulty getting enough sleep, it can lead directly to behavioral problems like anxiety, aggression and depression.

But what does your child’s bedroom have to do with a good night’s sleep? Can’t children just nod off anywhere?

That’s probably true for the family cat and dog, but little ones, just like adults, react to their environment. If their bedroom isn’t set up to encourage sound sleep, your child might be tossing and turning all night. If there are too many distractions or too much light, your son may be too hyper to get enough sound sleep to get through the day.

Here is a look at three potential roadblocks for a good night’s sleep in your child’s bedroom.

Too Bright

The brain responds to light, sending signals to wake up. This is fine if it’s the morning sun. If it is caused by overhead lights, computer lights and bedside lamps, it can confuse his brain into thinking it’s time to get up, not go to sleep.

Here are a few easy adjustments to make his room more sleep-friendly:

  1. if your child insists on a nightlight, use one with no more than seven watts. Make sure the light doesn’t shine on him in bed.
  2. use light-blocking curtains or shades on the windows. This is v ery helpful during the long days of summer.
  3. use low wattage on lamps by the bed
  4. make sure all lights are turned off when he goes to bed

 

Too Distracting

Young kids, much like their parents, love the latest gadgets. It is not uncommon to find computers, tablets, televisions, video games and music devices even in young children’s bedrooms. These can be great for stimulating their minds. But stimulation is exactly what you want to avoid before bed.

When a child tries to sleep, his brain should be soothed, not riled. A good way to prevent overstimulation is to remove the gadgets before bedtime. Better yet, make it a rule to store and use them in another room of the house.

Many children like to go to sleep to the sound of gentle music. This can certainly be helpful to get the body and brain relaxed. But keep on top of what your child is listening to. Heavy metal and other raucous sounds can keep him up a good part of the night, preventing productive sleep.

Too Disorganized

If your child’s bed is a mass of books, papers, toys and gadgets, it can be hard for her to climb into bed and get comfortable. Clutter on kids furniture is distressing, the wrong emotional note for a good night’s sleep.

The remedy is to convince your child to put things away. Once they see how much more room they have available, it encourages them to keep the room picked up. Bunk beds are a great way to free up floor space if you’ve got two children in one room.

Invest in hangers that are easy to reach, storage chests for toys, book shelves and dressers with several drawers to encourage your child to put things away. Child-size units are available at most shops, like Bolton Furniture, that sell bedroom furnishings. Also check out thrift stores for great deals on used youth bedroom furniture.

 

 Resource: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19250175



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