January 22, 2013

Feeling Good About Homework: Creating Space Kids Will Love to Learn In

Homework is a daily fact of life for most families. It comes at the end of the work and school day when the household is humming with phone calls and texts, coordinating schedules, dinner preparation and the countless tasks of day to day life.


Homework is a daily fact of life for most families. It comes at the end of the work and school day when the household is humming with phone calls and texts, coordinating schedules, dinner preparation and the countless tasks of day to day life. Homework can feel like just another demand, something we are obliged to squeeze into our daily schedule. When we approach homework in this frazzled state, homework becomes stressful and anxiety provoking for both kids and parents. If this pattern is repeated for years on end, it can have a negative impact on how your child feels about learning, affecting his or her future.

Providing Children with Workspace Positive Learning

We all know that our surroundings or the environment we are in can have a profound impact on our mood. Loud music and bright lights can make us stressed. A lot of clutter can feel overwhelming. According to Psychologist Ken Graetz children tend to learn the best in environments where they experience positive emotions, and feel good in.

Creating a personalized, calming and engaging place for your child to study is one of the best things you can do to foster good study habits and lifelong learning. If you have the space, installing a child’s study wall desk is a great way to create the ideal learning environment for your child. Well stocked cubbies filled with books and art supplies blur the line between learning and play. Completed homework can lead to drawing or reading as the child moves easily from one activity to another in his desk area. The study area should allow the child to:

  • Personalize their space in an organised, coherent fashion-- pinboard, magnets, chalkboards and ample containers for books, pencils, pens, scissors, rulers etc. Everything needs a place!

  • Engage in many different activities such as reading, writing, using a computer, making art or working on a school project with a friend

  • Access supplies in an easy-to-use way. All of the child’s “tools” should be easy to use and easy to put away

By creating the conditions for your child to feel great in their personalized learning environment, and creating the conditions to move from one activity to another with freedom and imagination you are ensuring your child has a great foundation for positive learning and a bright future.

Resources:

Psychologist Ken Graetz, author of The Psychology of Learning Environments http://www.educause.edu/members/ken-graetz

How a family benefitted from a designated homework area.
https://www.mirrormoms.com/page/content.detail/id/510323/Whole-family-benefits-from-a-designated-homework-area.html?nav=5113

http://www.educause.edu/research-and-publications/books/learning-spaces/chapter-6-psychology-learning-environments

http://archive.brookespublishing.com/newsletters/downloads/Kaufman_strategies.pdf

http://www.maryannsmialek.com/resources/articles/homework_tips.html



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